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This column on New Year’s resolutions is dedicated to my friend Mal (as he will be known here), who believes in self-betterment through bile.

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The comic philosopher Linus Van Pelt famously said “I love mankind, it’s people I can’t stand,” and it’s easy to have a similarly conflicted feeling about holiday gifts.

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“A rabbi, an imam and a pastor were arrested together in front of the White House,” Todd Saddler said.

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Dr. Sandra Steingraber is a biologist and science writer who has taught at Cornell University and Ithaca College. She is a leading public health advocate and environmentalist.

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Cornell University was founded in Ithaca in 1865. Not until three years later did its progenitor, Ezra Cornell, declare “I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study.”

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With the pandemic there have been unforeseen problems everywhere, of course, but beyond the universal kind, Ithaca is a benign locale that does well in evading many earthly sorts.

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A.’s daughter starts at Binghamton University this year and they are busy planning the trip there. A. is a bit nervous about it, as she often is about driving to new places. It’s not so much the driving itself (although she never really learned to like driving, a city kid who didn't get her …

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2019 marked the 50th anniversary of “Slaughterhouse-Five,” the best-selling novel by Kurt Vonnegut, considered a classic of its time for its groundbreaking genre-bending and countercultural leanings.

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Henry Thoreau was a Harvard guy, not Cornell, and famously of Walden Pond, not Cayuga’s waters, but has facets of an honorary Ithacan. 

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Ithaca is a town of avid readers, also writers, and every spring marks it with its Spring Writes Literary Festival: scores of literary-themed events featuring over 100 local writers. 

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The Finger Lakes region of New York is an important place in the history of struggles against oppression in the United States.

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Mother’s Day is upon us, and as with many holidays, in progressive Ithaca it is celebrated readily, but with a commitment to deeper meaning. Ithaca has groups like “Moms Against Bombs” (which you will see parading in the Ithaca Festival) reminding us that the American version of the holiday …

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Summer is for hedonists, autumn for the melancholic, winter for the fatalistic. Spring is for the hopeful, those who seek signs and will believe in almost anything, since miracles by definition can never be commonplace, yet are inevitable.

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After the pandemic hit a year ago, three sites for food sharing suddenly and inexplicably, or at least without fanfare or introduction, appeared in different directions within four blocks of my home in Ithaca’s Southside neighborhood. 

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In most places you’d rather eat a broom than go to the Department of Motor Vehicles, that governmental limbo of lines and complexities and infamous waster of time.

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There’s a sting to the thought about Black History Month, that somehow it is consigned to February, the coldest, shortest month of the year. 

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The City-Dwellers’ Almanac (just invented for this column) measures snowfall not in inches but in time, and defines a blizzard as a snowstorm that has you digging out your car for at least half an hour.