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Judy Stock figured out what made her happy in fourth grade when she learned to play clarinet; later, singing in her school choir, she had her happiest moments making music amongst friends. “I didn’t mind auditioning, being on stage—I was a middle child and I liked the attention,” Judy laughs.

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A native Ithacan, Ahmed Telfair’s parents, Jacquelyn Bailor and Anthony Telfair, grew up in Tompkins County. Ahmed’s ancestors, Peter and Phyllis Webb, were selected by the History Center for their bicentennial exhibition “The Webbs: A Tompkins County Family.” The Center highlighted the Webb…

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Growing up in the South, David Furber was drawn to both history and technology. He recalls that his eighth-grade social studies project was a narrative and series of pictures Furber had taken accompanying an exhibit about the local history of his hometown, Powder Springs, Georgia. Later in c…

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Growing up, John Corbin’s family moved around a lot. In 2012, when John was 15, he joined his father in Ithaca. Completing his GED early, he entered the world of work: first, as a dishwasher at Northstar in Fall Creek, then over time he moved up to sous chef, working with the owners.

featured
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Growing up, Michail Konstantinos Chalkiopoulos knew that he loved music most of all, and he urged his mother to help him receive piano lessons. But the family resources in their home in Patras, Greece could only be stretched so far. Instead, he studied hard at school, starting with English c…

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Many readers have been out of town, even out of the country when they need emergency tech assistance: They’ve washed their iPhone in with their clothes. They spill coffee on their keyboard.They forgot their charging cable. So, they make their way to a Staples store and

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Growing up Brandy Nielsen observed first-hand the challenges children with developmental diagnoses and their families face. Some families cannot find the time, energy and resources essential to address special needs. Brandy’s family encouraged each person’s development, according to his or h…

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Remember that neighborhood place you’d go to on Sunday nights, before life got so frenetic? No cover. Local musicians whom you admire from around town. Volume just right for catching up with friends who love the place too? 

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Nomi Falk and her sister Daniella have spent their whole lives in Fall Creek in Ithaca, NY. Sort of. Nomi, 14, who is heading to Ithaca High School in a few weeks, visits Israel (where her father Oren Falk and mother Yael Levitte grew up) once a year. This year the family also spent time in …

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According to bagel experts Long Island is right at the top of the charts for producing authentic New York style bagels.  Brothers Ramsey and Gregar Brous have the story how authentic bagels became a staple in Ithaca: Parents Ira and Anne Brous grew up on Long Island. As a young adult Anne wo…

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When we were kids, I would creep out from bed to the living room couches. I would lie on one, and my father, another early riser, would lie on the other couch.  As he read the Washington Post, he would pass me the pages. I couldn’t read yet, but I could search for his name (and his picture),…

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When Rachel Ferrara was a first grader in Rhode Island her mother received a call from a classmate’s parent: “I’m calling about the toy drive Rachel has arranged to collect toys for kids in the homeless shelter. I want to know where to drop off the toys.”  Until that call, Rachel’s mother ha…

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We were wowed when Jameelia Ricks, an “only girl” with four older and four younger brothers, graduated from Tompkins Cortland Community College (TC3). A single parent to Ashan, she entered TC3 when Ashan was old enough to enter TC3 daycare. Transplanted in Tompkins County from a violent neig…

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Judy Stock figured out what made her happy in fourth grade when she learned to play clarinet; later, singing in her school choir, she had her happiest moments making music amongst friends. “I didn’t mind auditioning, being on stage—I was a middle child and I liked the attention,” Judy laughs.

  • 0

A native Ithacan, Ahmed Telfair’s parents, Jacquelyn Bailor and Anthony Telfair, grew up in Tompkins County. Ahmed’s ancestors, Peter and Phyllis Webb, were selected by the History Center for their bicentennial exhibition “The Webbs: A Tompkins County Family.” The Center highlighted the Webb…

  • 0

Growing up in the South, David Furber was drawn to both history and technology. He recalls that his eighth-grade social studies project was a narrative and series of pictures Furber had taken accompanying an exhibit about the local history of his hometown, Powder Springs, Georgia. Later in c…

  • 0

Growing up, John Corbin’s family moved around a lot. In 2012, when John was 15, he joined his father in Ithaca. Completing his GED early, he entered the world of work: first, as a dishwasher at Northstar in Fall Creek, then over time he moved up to sous chef, working with the owners.

featured
  • 0

Growing up, Michail Konstantinos Chalkiopoulos knew that he loved music most of all, and he urged his mother to help him receive piano lessons. But the family resources in their home in Patras, Greece could only be stretched so far. Instead, he studied hard at school, starting with English c…

  • 0

Many readers have been out of town, even out of the country when they need emergency tech assistance: They’ve washed their iPhone in with their clothes. They spill coffee on their keyboard.They forgot their charging cable. So, they make their way to a Staples store and

  • 0

Growing up Brandy Nielsen observed first-hand the challenges children with developmental diagnoses and their families face. Some families cannot find the time, energy and resources essential to address special needs. Brandy’s family encouraged each person’s development, according to his or h…

  • 0

Remember that neighborhood place you’d go to on Sunday nights, before life got so frenetic? No cover. Local musicians whom you admire from around town. Volume just right for catching up with friends who love the place too? 

  • 0

Nomi Falk and her sister Daniella have spent their whole lives in Fall Creek in Ithaca, NY. Sort of. Nomi, 14, who is heading to Ithaca High School in a few weeks, visits Israel (where her father Oren Falk and mother Yael Levitte grew up) once a year. This year the family also spent time in …

  • 0

According to bagel experts Long Island is right at the top of the charts for producing authentic New York style bagels.  Brothers Ramsey and Gregar Brous have the story how authentic bagels became a staple in Ithaca: Parents Ira and Anne Brous grew up on Long Island. As a young adult Anne wo…

  • 0

When we were kids, I would creep out from bed to the living room couches. I would lie on one, and my father, another early riser, would lie on the other couch.  As he read the Washington Post, he would pass me the pages. I couldn’t read yet, but I could search for his name (and his picture),…

  • 0

When Rachel Ferrara was a first grader in Rhode Island her mother received a call from a classmate’s parent: “I’m calling about the toy drive Rachel has arranged to collect toys for kids in the homeless shelter. I want to know where to drop off the toys.”  Until that call, Rachel’s mother ha…

  • 0

We were wowed when Jameelia Ricks, an “only girl” with four older and four younger brothers, graduated from Tompkins Cortland Community College (TC3). A single parent to Ashan, she entered TC3 when Ashan was old enough to enter TC3 daycare. Transplanted in Tompkins County from a violent neig…

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When we think about our mental health, realists comment that “We live by a thread.” We can feel confident and optimistic one day and insecure and pessimistic the next day, even the next hour. Mental illness is equal opportunity; Psychiatrists and other observers will confide how many profess…

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Growing up in the heart of Appalachia in West Virginia, there were not many children whose four grandparents came from Eastern European Jewish communities.  Bob Riter, the outgoing Executive Director of the Cancer Resource Center, remembers his grandparents as sunny, optimistic and kind.  Th…

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This has been an over the top year for our History Center – celebrating the 200th anniversary of Tompkins County (1817) and 100th year celebration of the establishment of women’s right to vote in New York State (1917). Rod Howe, the Center’s director, has fostered such engaging and lively pr…

Editorials

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With its 42nd edition arriving at the end of this month, the Ithaca Festival is undoubtedly an institution. Read more

Letters

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On June 13, 2019 Governor Cuomo signed legislation that removed non-medical exemptions from school vaccination requirements for children. This means parents or guardians may no longer claim any exemption other than a medical one. To attend public, private or parochial schools for pre-kindergarten through grade 12 or to attend child day care, children must be fully vaccinated unless they have a medical exemption.  Read more

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After weed-killer was applied on the lawn in my apartment complex, ornamental plants died and crab-apple trees were affected. Evidently, the herbicide was very toxic. It will end up in ground water and in the lake! Vinegar and hot water are a safer alternative to herbicides. Herbicides are not the only negative effect of lawn care; like gasoline-burning cars, lawn movers emit polluting gases to the atmosphere. Yet, there are grasses that don’t need to be mowed. If you check the internet for “short grasses for landscaping”, you’ll see that there are grasses that don’t need to be mowed. If landscapers were to choose that type of ground cover, we would slow down the progress of global climate change. Read more

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In recent weeks, we have been presented with horrific descriptions of what is happening to families and children at the border between the United States and Mexico. In the past people wanting to enter the U.S. have been mostly men from Mexico who were looking for work to support their families back home. Now unprecedented numbers of people, mostly families with children or unaccompanied children are coming to the border to ask for asylum. They are fleeing violence or extreme poverty or both and most of them come from the small countries to the south of Mexico, namely Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. The journey is dangerous and they often have to wait a long time in the border cities in Mexico where the situation is just as treacherous.  Read more

Guest Opinions

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I read with great interest the letter published in the Times’ 7.31.19 issue with regard to “Cornell’s Relationship with Qatar.” In general, I’m in agreement with the assertion by Mr. Hanna and the “People’s Organizing Collective at Cornell University” that the relationship between Cornell, Weill Cornell Medical College and the Qatar Foundation bears continuing scrutiny mainly because of the well-documented abuses of migrant laborers in that country. These are the people who are literally building Qatar and its capital city, Doha, as well as the Education City campus where Weill Cornell, among numerous other American universities, has its medical school. Read more

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