Volunteers were hard at work last weekend setting out all the goods available at the Jacksonville Holiday Bazaar and Craft Show. The show will take place Nov. 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 1869 Trumansburg Rd., Jacksonville.

Volunteers were hard at work last weekend setting out all the goods available at the Jacksonville Holiday Bazaar and Craft Show. The show will take place Nov. 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 1869 Trumansburg Rd., Jacksonville.

 

Get your gift list ready, because the Jacksonville Holiday Bazaar and Craft Show is returning Nov. 27 and promises the same wide selection of quality items that locals have come to expect for the last five decades. 

After a hiatus last year due to COVID-19, the event will be back Nov. 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Jacksonville Methodist Church, 1869 Trumansburg Road, Jacksonville. 

Rebecca Housworth, chairwoman of the fundraising efforts for the church, suggested shoppers could make the most of their Saturday by visiting the bazaar, then heading up the road to Trumansburg, where they can continue their Small Business Saturday at the village’s many unique Main Street stores, followed by a bite to eat at one of the area’s many restaurants. 

The church will have a big room full of handmade crafts, including different varieties of art, woodcarvings, hand knitted items and handmade quilts. Everything is handmade with the exception of some of the goodies tucked into the gift baskets available this year, though all the items for the baskets were hand selected and the baskets artfully arranged by hand.

There will be 20 vendors—a few less than the 25 to 30 that are usually on display at the bazaar, said Housworth. This was a conscious decision by the event organizers.

“We wanted to put some space between them and have more room for people to walk around,” Housworth said, adding that vendors were very eager to show off their wares once again after having a long break from sales like these. 

All the goods sold by vendors must also be handmade or hand embellished. 

One exception is the United Methodists Women Group booth, which sells cookbooks and kitchen knives and is usually very popular, Housworth said. 

There will also be a scaled back version of the luncheon normally hosted by the bazaar. There will be soups, chilis and baked goods for sale, and shoppers can dine in or take them to go. 

Across the street at “The Attic” thrift shop, shoppers will find a huge variety of gently used items for sale, from kitchen wares to toys to clothes for infants, children, men and women (the clothing goes for five dollars per bag). 

The deadline for dropping off used items has passed, Housworth said, adding that they had a “a ton” of donations last Saturday. 

The weekend after the bazaar The Attic will be offering everything left over for half price. 

The funds from the bazaar will most likely be earmarked for the replacement of the church’s leaky roof, said Housworth, who remembers volunteering at the bazaar when she was a child. She estimated the yearly event has taken place for roughly 50 years. 

The money raised also goes toward holiday gift baskets for local families in need. 

“Hopefully the pubic will be eager to see their neighbors and to do a little in-person shopping—safely, with masks indoors and social distancing,” said Housworth, whose favorite part of the bazaar is the camaraderie she feels and “the smiles on people’s faces and knowing we’re doing something good for everybody. It’s a lot of work, but the smiles at the end of the day are worth it.”

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