Carolyn Greenwald was recently elected as a new village trustee.

Carolyn Greenwald was recently elected as a new village trustee.

 

After a quarter of a decade, there will be a new face in the mayoral seat in the Village of Lansing. Deputy Mayor Ronny Hardaway is succeeding Don Hartill, who after 25 years in office will be moving on to focus on his full-time position at Cornell University, according to Village Clerk/Treasurer Jodi Dake. Hardaway ran unopposed in the April 27 election, receiving 89.6 percent of the vote (12 write-ins).

In addition to Hardaway’s election, Carolyn Greenwald and Patricia O’Rourke were elected and reelected, respectively, to the Board of Trustees. Greenwald previously volunteered as a member of the Planning Board prior to running for one of the trustee seats. O’Rourke will serve as Deputy Mayor now that Hardaway is mayor. O’Rourke received 47.5 percent of the vote and Greenwald received 45.4 percent (five write-ins).

Hardaway and Greenwald sat down with the Lansing Ledger to discuss their new terms and what they each hope to accomplish in their new positions. (O’Rourke did not respond to the Ledger’s interview request.)

Lansing Ledger: What are you most excited about with the position you were elected to?

Ronny Hardaway: I am most excited about working with the Village of Lansing staff, board members, and advisory committee members to help support and improve the quality of life for village residents and local businesses. I am also excited to work with neighboring municipalities and with the Tompkins County Legislature and staff to address social, economic, and environmental issues that affect the village as part of the larger county community.

LL: What skills and experiences will you be bringing to the village board?

RH: My educational and professional skills and experiences are diverse. My undergraduate degree is a Bachelor of Arts in English Literature and History. My graduate degree is a Master of Science in Software Engineering – an educational merging of logical and analytical processes with creative and artistic processes perhaps.

Valuable core values and skills that I formed through my experiences are leadership, communication, meeting facilitation, consensus building, team management, and process improvement.

I successfully managed many small teams averaging less than 10 members within diverse business domains. I also coordinated an international team of 25 software process appraisers who evaluated, analyzed, and reported findings for multiple domestic and international sites of an embedded-software development organization. Through my management experiences, I refined my skills in communication, meeting facilitation, consensus building, and personnel management. I used managerial and process transparency to build coherency and adaptability into the teams that I led.

LL: What do you hope to accomplish during your term?

RH: The village mayoral term is two years, which is brief within the span of municipal governance. During this term I hope to help the owners of the Shops at Ithaca Mall transition to a subdivision model that promises to extend the life and revenue stream of the mall properties.

To benefit both municipalities, the Village of Lansing and the Town of Lansing plan to install a new sewer line along East Shore Drive and down Cayuga Heights Road into the Village of Cayuga Heights’ wastewater treatment plant. We hope to complete this sewer line project within this two-year term.

For over 20 years, the village has experienced dangerous speeding-traffic issues along Dart Drive, and I hope to mitigate those safety issues by narrowing the road surface and installing a sidewalk and LED streetlights along the residential street. Working with the village’s Greenway Committee and its climate and clean-energy committees, I hope to expand the walkability of the village by creating more sidewalks and walkways, to provide more recreational areas by improving our village parks and greenways, and to become a clean-energy/climate-smart municipality by reducing the village-government’s use of fossil-fuel-based energy.

LL: What do you anticipate will be the biggest challenges heading into your term? How do you plan to address them?

RH: Some of the biggest challenges and their mitigation were covered in my responses to the previous question. A significant challenge overarching the challenges, and their mitigation, is the management of the village’s annual budget. As mayor, it is important that I guide our budget process to sustain the village government, its staff, and its municipal services. I will try to anticipate needs for the village and help our trustees and staff plan and approve budgets to support the village and help it grow consistent with fiscal responsibility.

LL: What vision of the village do you hope to create during your term?

The Village of Lansing is attractive and welcoming for homeowners, renters, and diverse businesses. My vision is to sustain the current health of the village for our residents and businesses with proactive maintenance of our streets and roads, our water supply systems, our sewer systems, and our streetlights.

A significant part of our village’s attractiveness is the diversity of our neighborhoods and our small-town character. Part of my vision is to sustain that neighborly character by working [with] our staff and board members to expand the walkability of the village and to grow, protect, and maintain our greenways and municipal parks.

To promote walkability, I envision a village economic-development committee to attract new businesses into our community that invite residents to walk to shop, have meals, and enjoy our village neighborhoods. I would like to see more pedestrian and bicycle usage in our village and minimal vehicle traffic.

These plans encompass my vision for the Village of Lansing. Our dedicated staff and board members have visions for the village, also. We will continue to meld our visions in public service to help make a safe, bright future for everyone who lives in, works in, or visits the Village of Lansing.

Lansing Ledger: What are you most excited about with the position you were elected to?

Carolyn Greenwald: I am most excited about maximizing opportunities for the Village and to create a vibrant, walkable community that preserves our greenspace and natural resources.

LL: What skills and experiences will you be bringing to the village board?

CG: I am an attorney, so I have an understanding of laws and codes. I spent the past six years on the Planning Board, so I have established relationships with the Village staff and other elected officials, experience with the workings of our local government, and understand the Village’s interests regarding development and development projects. I am also a parent, so I have an appreciation for a community that fosters development for all ages.

LL: What do you hope to accomplish during your term?

CG: My first objective is to pass a sidewalk resolution that requires developers to install sidewalks. There are additional code changes that the Planning Board has discussed for years, including a code covering the installation of solar arrays and changes to zoning. I plan to work with the Department of Public Works, the Mayor, the other Trustees, the Village clerk, the Village attorney and the Village code officer to draft long-discussed and much needed code changes.

LL: What do you anticipate will be the biggest challenges heading into your term? How do you plan to address them?

CG: The biggest challenge is the impact of Covid-19 and making sure our community is vaccinated, masked, and practices social distancing as recommended by the State of New York and the CDC while maintaining access to village government. The village will continue with public outreach and plans to continue to stream meetings.

LL: What vision of the village do you hope to create during your term?

CG: My vision of the Village is a walkable community that provides safe and well-maintained infrastructure, a growing and stable economy, and access to greenspace.

(2) comments

Richard Ballantyne

A quarter of a decade is 2.5 years, not 25 years.

Adam Tran

I assumed he served a term of 2.5 years

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