Cargill Facilities Manager Shawn Wilczynski (above) presented a project for a new salt shed at a Planning Board meeting last Tuesday that would reduce the environmental impact of the lower storage pad at the mine.

Cargill Facilities Manager Shawn Wilczynski (above) presented a project for a new salt shed at a Planning Board meeting last Tuesday that would reduce the environmental impact of the lower storage pad at the mine.

 

The Cargill Salt Mine is looking to reduce its environmental impact with its current proposal to the Town of Lansing Planning Board.

At a meeting on Aug. 25, Cargill Facilities Manager Shawn Wilczynski presented a project for a salt shed for the lower storage pad on the site. The shed would be 600 feet by 200 feet and 75 feet tall and would help lower dusty emissions from the discharge of the conveyor belt and any stormwater grime generation related to the storage of the salt on the pad.

“The discharge of the salts from the conveyor belt would be encompassed within the building structures, and then as well the salt that we generally have on the lower pad from an operational context is very seldom do we get to a point where we actually have an opportunity to tarp and cover that salt that is on those pads in order to reduce the amount of stormwater generation that’s associated with us storing salt or handling salt at that facility,” Wilczynski said.

“We have three pads that are possibly the same footprint,” he said. “The other two pads, however, we’re able to stack and cover, and they’re only really exposed for about one month, and then however long it takes us to offload them during the winter time. So their influence as far as when it’s actually uncovered is significantly less than what the lower pad is, which is why we would like to start there with that building.”

The height of the proposed shed is 40 feet higher than the limit set by the town for structures, and therefore Cargill will need to obtain a variance from the Zoning Board of Appeals in order to build it 75 feet high.

Planning Board member Tom Butler asked Wilczynski if the company plans on installing two more pads in the future, which Wilczynski said is possible.

“At the cost of $5 million per pad, I would say it would be something that would have to be dependent upon the economic impacts and stuff of that,” Wilczynski said. “Again, that’s why we’re starting with the lower pad first because it has the highest potential for influence just due to its inherent nature.”

Possible New Bank Coming to Lansing

Later during the Aug. 25 meeting, the board was presented with a project for a new bank – Cayuga Lake National Bank – that would reside on the east side of North Triphammer Road at Franklyn Drive.

The project, proposed by local architect George Breuhaus and Christopher Maby of Delta Engineers, Architects, & Surveyors, features a two-story, 3,000-square-foot bank with parking and other site improvements as well as a subdivision of nearly 3.5 acres of land. The total cost of the project would be $1.5 million. If approved, construction of the bank would begin this fall and be completed in the spring of 2021.

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